Usage

Once you’ve installed Stackoverflow Watcher you have two ways of using it:

  1. Run it using the “stack-watcher” command.
  2. Use the underlying library directly from your code.

Once you’re comfortable with this you can begin customising how it behaves by subclassing the main components. This provides a lot of flexibility and isn’t difficult. You can learn how to do this in the customising section and see examples of it in action in the examples directory.

Command Line

Stackoverflow Watcher comes with the “stack-watcher” command. You can use this from the shell to start watching and filtering questions. The arguments are:

--tag What tag should we restrict the feed to?
--interval How many seconds should we wait between feed requests?
--retriever What Python class should we use for the Retriever?
--question What Python class should we use for Question objects?

If you wanted to watch all of the latest questions, with no filtering at all. You would use the command on it’s own like so:

$ stack-watcher

Let’s say you wanted to watch only questions that have the html tag. You could use the `tag` argument like this:

$ stack-watcher --tag html

Library

Stackoverflow Watcher also has an API which you can use directly in your own code. Here’s an example that does pretty much the same thing as the “stack-watcher” command with no arguments:

from stack_watcher import Retriever

retriever = Retriever()

for question in retriever.questions():
    print(question)

This will continue retrieving and displaying new questions indefinitely.

If you wanted to restrict the questions to a specific tag you could pass the `tag` argument to Retriever like this:

from stack_watcher import Retriever

retriever = Retriever(tag='html')

for question in retriever.questions():
    print(question)